Solid State Drives – The Biggest Change to Mobile Computing Since Wireless

first_img.n Hello,I wanted to take a minute to talk about solid state drives and the impact they have had on my mobile computing experience but we put together this video which does a better job than I can do in words alone.  Enjoy!last_img

IT Project Management – A Lost Skill Set?

first_imgI have gotten myself on what feels like way too many RSS feeds regarding topics regarding IT and Information Technology – however, I’m a learning addict so probably won’t stop.  Anyway, over the past serveral months, I have been bombarded by IT project management horror stories and advice on how to better manage these programs.The question I began asking myself centered around the topic of IT project management … Is successful project management more of an art or science?Working inside an IT organization and seeing the large number of projects that are running concurrently consuming resources ($, people, capital), it is clear that employing best practices in the area of program and project management can be a strategic competitive advantage to the business.  Delays on one project can have significant negative ripple effects to other projects – resulting not only in delayed delivery of promised business capability but also in IT operational costs and head count requirements.I liken this to air traffic control and the dependencies that are created both at individual airports and between airports when the schedule gets delayed.  There are too many times when my flight has been delayed because the flights in another airport hub were affected by weather or poor airline performance or some other reason (I refuse to point fingers, but there are some airlines that I have lost faith in)The challenge for IT is that if we are not able to keep our project schedules on track, not only will the cost to run IT go up, but the business will lose faith in IT, resulting in the three O’s (increased oversight, more overhead or likelihood of outsourcing).Inside Intel IT, our IT management team places a core emphasis on project management and streamlining operations.  We have implemented a grass-roots training program called Triple E in IT (Embedding Efficiency and Effectiveness) where all IT employees are trained in ways to identify and remove non value add activities from business process.  Since inception, this program has trained over 60% of our IT employee population and created more that 400 ideas inside Intel to improve organizational efficiency.  Additionally, the Intel IT organization organization is the corporate lead for the Lean Six Sigma program and we have successfully implemented this methodology on several IT sustainability projects.In the end, I can’t provide you any advice on IT best practices for project management. I’m not qualified.  However, this week, I met someone inside Intel IT who is.  Jeff Hodgkinson has 30+ years in project/program management and is currently the Intel IT Internal Cloud Program Manager.   Jeff also received PMI’s 2010 Distinguished Contribution Award.Maybe Jeff can answer the question if project management is more art or science.  Ask him here or share your thoughts with me below and I’ll drag him in.Chrislast_img read more

Fringe case which makes all the difference

first_imgIntel is an interesting place to work as a Security professional. Everything has to be possible so you can’t say “no”. Requests like can I get email on my fridge at home are not common but we do get them.  Often in the back of your mind you think “why would anyone want that” but I have learned to be open minded (when email first came out I could not see the point in it and thought it would never take off).My passion is kayaking, I enjoy remote rivers which challenge me and really push my risk management skills to the limit. Well November last year I was paddling in South Wales and had an accident landing me in a wheelchair for 3 months (bad risk assessment day!!).Day one of hospital and my only communications tool is my mobile phone, which of course gives me company email, Calendar and contact information.  This is now a critical tool and my primary work device. As soon as possible I’m cancelling meetings and trying to let people know what’s going on. All of this on a 4 inch screen including the keyboard.Right next to my bed there is a full sized keyboard attached to the hospital information system; you can pay to get internet access, movies etc. This was the obvious tool for my email.I have often been asked about allowing employees access to email from cyber café locations and it was one of those “why would anyone want to do that” thoughts. After all they have email on their phones and most employees have laptops. The Security implications of allowing email from anywhere are really scary for what feels like little gain.Intel at the time was running a Proof of Concept (PoC) allowing employees to connect from any terminal to get email and I had been working on the security requirements for this testing. Well I never managed to get my email working via the hospital information system, there were too many security controls in the way, both on the Intel end and website blocking at the hospital end.My use case felt like a very rare example.  Speaking to other employees, most had a rare one off example where “Email from anywhere” would have made a big difference. This begs the question of how many one offs put together make the need for a solution?Dynamic security policies that adjust as a user moves from device to device, changing access, are the way forward. We do this in the mobile device world and are starting to with the larger from factors but now need to think about moving this from the exception to the norm. We also need to be able to evaluate the human element. Employees with good security practises should be able to work from more dangerous places.  I trust myself to look after my company’s data, there are others that I trust but how can you make that into a system which is fair? I think we need a security merit based system for people.As for me, well I’m now walking in a limited way and had plenty of time to come up with new ideas!Roblast_img read more

Blair Muller Guest Blog: Automated Console Integration Scripts for MS SCCM 2007 & Intel SCS 8

first_imgIntroduction from Blair Muller’s Blog 9/1/2012 from the link cited below:”Hi All,As some of you may know, I have been engaged by Intel to activate Vpro for 7 clients this financial year. We are focusing on clients with System Center Configuration Manager and integrating SCS with SCCM.At this point, we have reached out to two major clients in Australia and assisted there internal IT team reach their goal of activating Vpro. (Video presentations from clients to come, watch this space)I thought I would share my thoughts that I have learnt during the journey of activating Vpro and integrating it into SCCM.If you haven’t had a chance, you should check out my previous blogs on Vpro.A cheat sheet that may help you fast track the change control required to implement SCS in your environmentOpens in a new windowHow to remote control a VPro system on a IPv6 networkOpens in a new windowTroubleshooting KVM control for VproOpens in a new windowIntel KVM control not working with Transport Layer Security (TLS)Opens in a new windowI will also assume you have read and understood the Automated Console Integration scripts for MS SCCM 2007 & Intel® SCS 8Opens in a new window”____________________________________Read the blog here:Blair Muller’s Blog: What I have learnt about the automated console integration scripts for MS SCCM 2007 & Intel SCS 8last_img read more

Putting Nurse Practitioners in the Driver’s Seat for Better Rural Health

first_img[1] For more about the data in this paragraph, see National Rural Health Association, What’s Different About Rural Health? http://www.ruralhealthweb.org/go/left/about-rural-health/what-s-different-about-rural-health-care. Are nurse practitioners just what the doctor ordered for improving rural health? Health experts and nursing leaders I talk with say the answer is a resounding yes. Now, a sophisticated medical office on wheels, developed at the University of Kansas (KU) Center for Design Research (CDR), is ready to help us fill that prescription.The KU WellCar* empowers nurse practitioners—connected to remote physicians and other resources as needed—to take healthcare on the road. Created in collaboration with nurses and other health leaders, the WellCar was first seen as a vehicle to help nurse practitioners deliver primary care services in rural Kansas. But as healthcare continues to move out of the hospital or clinic and into the community and home, the WellCar is being eyed as a way to improve a broad range of healthcare services—and to extend care everywhere from inner cities to disaster sites.Empowering Mobile Care  How does the WellCar empower you if you’re the nurse practitioner behind the wheel? It means you can arrive at a patient’s home equipped to perform diagnostic procedures, document care, and provide patient education. Instead of the traditional black bag, you’re backed by a van full of robust, compact medical diagnostics equipment and computer and communications technology. You’ve got the patient’s up-to-date health history at your fingertips, along with data from in-home health monitoring equipment. Reflecting your vital role within the healthcare team, you’re equipped to conduct video conferences with remote experts and to securely collaborate and share results with labs and supervising organizations.There’s also a WellPac* that provides a case for carrying necessary equipment into the home and a work surface once you’re inside. But most equipment stays in the van—you transfer data to it wirelessly. The WellCar’s advanced communication system is also designed to link the digital equipment within the van and connect to secure external cloud services.The bottom line is that you can deliver the compassionate, personalized care that is so crucial to both care-givers and patients—and in a more coordinated, productive way. You’ll also help fill an urgent need. Nearly one-quarter of the United States population lives in rural areas, but only about 10 percent of physicians practice in rural America. Rural residents tend to be poorer than average and to suffer higher rates of poor health and suicide.[1] And of course the lack of healthcare services isn’t limited to the United States.A Product of Passion and Best Practices One thing I love about the WellCar is that it reflects the passions of the people who have created it. Professor Gregory Thomas, who heads the CDR and directed the project, is a cancer survivor and educator committed to having KU’s design students solve significant, real-world problems. He and his students followed best practices for user-centered innovation, including cross-disciplinary collaboration and close involvement with potential users. Students viewed the project as not simply a set of design challenges, but as something that can benefit their families and communities. Their advances in remote data collection won them Connected World magazine’s University Competition held in Chicago at the 2014 Connected World Conference.Passionate clinicians influenced all aspects of the design. Dr. Aenor Sawyer, associate director of strategic relations at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Center for Digital Health Innovation (CDHI), is both an orthopedist and a daughter who cared for her father at home for 10 years. She’s leading CDHI’s efforts to build out a next-generation model for highly distributed healthcare. She reached out to Professor Thomas after reading about the project, and became the WellCar’s medical director. Debbie Gregory, a registered nurse and co-founder of the Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design, shared her expertise in designing intuitive, productive healthcare experiences.Gordon Alloway, former project director of the Heartland Telehealth Resource Center and now a consultant specializing in rural health access, contributed his passion for helping rural Americans maintain their highly valued independence.Intel® Inside I also love the WellCar as an example of people using Intel® technologies to do amazing things. A Panasonic Toughpad* tablet computer powered by the Intel® Core™ i5 vPro™ processor provides what Professor Thomas calls the technology brains of the WellCar. A custom communication system designed by Cornerstone Integration uses Intel® technologies for the Internet of Things to manage communications within the van and to the outside world. The Intel Health and Life Sciences team shared technology roadmaps, insights on mobile workflows, and advice on solving technical challenges.Many other companies have recognized the WellCar’s potential impact and gotten involved. Ford donated a new Transit Connect Wagon*. Philips, HealthSTATS International, Vidyo, Voalte, and Midland Radio are among those providing expertise and equipment, either for the van itself or for patients’ homes.Increasing Access to Care Diverse organizations are beginning to explore how they can use the WellCar to help increase cost-effective access to high-quality healthcare. I’m excited to see where the WellCar’s road will take it.What role do you see for the WellCar? Are you eager to get behind the wheel? I hope you’ll read more and share your thoughts. Together, we can expand access for underserved patients wherever they reside.Read Intel’s case study about the WellCarLearn more about the WellCar and the KU Center for Design ResearchStay in touch: @hankinjoan, @IntelHealthlast_img read more

A Bucket of Wings: A Case Study of Better-Informed Decisions

first_imgIn my blog Use Data To Support Arguments, Not Arguments To Support Data, I articulated how better-informed decisions are typically made and the role that business intelligence (BI) should play. Shortly after I wrote the blog, I experienced a real-life event that clearly illustrates three main phases of “data-entangled decisions.”Since my family likes to take a day off from cooking on Fridays, we recently visited the deli of our favorite organic grocery store. At the take-out bar, I noticed an unusually long line of people under a large sign reading, “In-House Made Wing Buckets. All You Can Fill. On Sale for $4.99, Regular $9.99.” Well, I love wings Opens in a new windowand couldn’t resist the temptation to get a few.The opportunity was to add wings (one of my favorite appetizers) to my dinner. But instead of using the special wings bucket, I chose the regular salad bar container, which was priced at $8.99 per pound regardless of the contents. I reasoned that the regular container was an easier-to-use option (shaped like a plate) and a cheaper option (since I was buying only a few wings). My assumptions about the best container to use led to a split-second decision—I “blinked” instead of “thinking twice.”Interestingly, a nice employee saw me getting the wings in the regular container and approached me. Wary of my reaction, he politely reminded me of the sale and pointed out that I may pay more if I use the regular container because the wing bucket had a fixed cost (managed risk).Although at first this sounded reasonable, when I asked if it would weigh enough to result in a higher cost, he took it to one of the scales behind the counter and discovered it was less than half a pound. This entire ordeal took less than 30 seconds and now I had the information I needed to make a better-informed decision.This clinched it, because now two factors were in my favor. I knew that a half pound of the $8.99, regular-priced option was less than the $4.99, fixed-priced bucket option. And I knew that they would deduct the weight of the regular deli container at the register, resulting in an even lower price. I ended up paying $4.02.This every-day event provides a good story to demonstrate the three phases as it relates to the business of better-informed decisions and the role of BI—or data in general.Phase 1: ReactionWhen the business opportunity (wing purchase) presented itself, I made some assumptions with limited data and formed my preliminary conclusion. If it weren’t for the store employee, I would have continued to proceed to the cash register ignorant of all the data. Sometimes in business, we tend to do precisely the same thing. We either don’t validate our initial assumptions and/or we make a decision based on our preliminary conclusions.Phase 2: ValidationBy weighing the container, I was able to obtain additional data and validate my assumptions to quickly take advantage of business opportunities —exactly what BI is supposed to do. With data, I was able to conclude with a great degree of confidence that I had mitigated the risk that it was the right approach. This is also typical of how BI can shed more light on many business decisions.Phase 3: ExecutionI made my decision by taking into account reliable data to support my argument, not arguments to support data. I was able to do this because I (as the decision maker) had an interest in relying on data and the data I needed was available to me in an objective form (use of the scale). This allowed me to eliminate any false personal judgments (like my initial assumptions or the employee’s recommendation).From the beginning, I could have disregarded the employee’s warning or simply not cared much about the final price. If that had been my attitude, then no data or BI tool would have made a difference in my final decision. And I might have been wrong.On the other hand, if I had listened to the initial argument by that nice employee without backing it up with data, I would have been equally wrong. I would have made a bad decision based on what appeared to be a reasonable argument that was actually flawed.When I insisted on asking the question that would validate the employee’s argument, I took a step that is the business equivalent of insisting on more data because we may not have enough to make a decision.By resorting to an objective and reliable method (using the scale), I was able to remove personal judgments.In 20/20 HindsightNow, I realize that business decisions are never this simple. Organizations’ risk is likely measured in the millions of dollars, not cents. And sometimes we don’t have the luxury of finding objective tools (such as the scale) in time to support our decision making. However, I believe that many business decisions mirror the same sequences.Consider the implications if this were a business decision that resulted in a decision of $100 in the wrong direction. Now simply assume that these types of less-informed or uninformed decisions were made once a week throughout the year by 1000 employees. The impact would be $5 million.Hence, the cost to our organization increases as:The cost of the error risesErrors are made more frequentlyThe number of employees making the error growsBottom LineBetter-informed decisions start and end with leadership that is keen to promote the culture of data-driven decision making. BI, if designed and implemented effectively, can be the framework that enables organizations of all sizes to drive growth and profitability.What other obstacles do you face in making better-informed decisions?Connect with me on Twitter (@KaanTurnali) and LinkedIn.This story originally appeared on the SAP Analytics Blog.last_img read more

NIH Reveals Stem Cell Providers

first_imgThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) pleased stem cell watchers today by announcing the names of 10 companies and research groups that have human embryonic stem cells federally funded researchers can use. Together, those groups claim to have 64 lines, far more than most experts have believed to be both high-quality and accessible to researchers.The list has several surprises. One is a relatively unknown company, CyThera, set up less than 2 years ago in San Diego, that claims to have nine embryonic stem cell lines and is currently trying to develop pancreatic islet cells for treatment of diabetes. In another surprise, NIH located two embryonic stem cell groups in India: one at Reliance Life Sciences in Mumbai, which makes new blood products; the other at the National Center for Biological Sciences in Bangalore. India’s biotechnology secretary had earlier told Science she knew of no such cell lines in the country.How good are the cells? In a statement put on the Web this morning, NIH reported that all 64 lines “show characteristics of stem cell morphology” and have undergone several population doublings, and most of them have demonstrated all the protein markers “known to be associated with human embryonic stem cells.” NIH says it will soon come up with more extensive information on the scientific quality of the cells, including details on how they were cultivated, growth characteristics, and evidence of pluripotency (their ability to grow into any of the more than 200 human tissue types).Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)NIH will not be the middleman for researchers who want access to the cells. “Once they’re posted, NIH is basically out of it,” says Judith Greenberg, who’s in charge of setting up the stem cell registry. Although the NIH Office of Technology Transfer is crafting a model agreement that could be used between stem cell suppliers and researchers, individuals in each transaction will have to work out the details themselves.Reactions to the Bush policy will be aired next month at an all-day hearing that Senator Ted Kennedy (D-MA), chair of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, will hold on 5 September. Meanwhile, observers seem to feel that NIH has been moving expeditiously. Says Tony Mazzaschi of the Association of American Medical Colleges, “I have to say I think they’ve done a wonderful job.”NIH statement and listlast_img read more

Top U.K. Drug Adviser Out

first_imgIllicit drugs, science and politics can be a volatile mix, no doubt. So it’s not a total surprise that David Nutt, a respected psychopharmacologist at the Bristol outpost of Imperial College London, was canned today as the U.K. top drug advisor. His downfall was a paper in which Nutt argued that ecstasy and other drugs caused less harm than alcohol, although the researcher had clashed before with the government’s drug policies. Phil Willis, Chairman of the House of Commons science and technology committee, has already released a statement noting he asked the Home Secretary “for clarification as to why the distinguished scientist Sir David Nutt has been removed of duties as Chair of Advisory Council on Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) at a time when independent scientific advice to government is essential. It is disturbing if an independent scientist should be removed for reporting sound scientific advice.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Map of 7000 Holy Land Archaeological Sites Recognized

first_imgIsraelis and Palestinians—after 2 years of intense negotiation and investigation—have mapped some 7000 archaeological sites in the Holy Land, many of them hotly contested. Some of the information had been kept secret by the Israeli military for decades.  The effort is being recognized with an award presented today at the American Schools of Oriental Research archaeology conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. “Palestinians in particular have not had all the information necessary to them about the location of archaeological sites,” says Lynn Dodd, an archaeologist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles who helped create the map. “This resource facilitates their preparation for the negotiation table.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Mosquitoes: Love at First Buzz

first_imgHow do you mate with the right person if everyone looks exactly the same? That’s a problem that faces the Anopheles gambiae complex of mosquitoes, a group that comprises six identical-looking species. The solution, according to a new study, is to find a partner who can sing in perfect harmony with you.Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes carry the malaria parasite, which kills more than a million people every year. Although the group consists of a half- dozen species, researchers can only distinguish them with molecular tests. In the West African country of Burkina Faso, two forms of one of the six A. gambiae species–called “M” and “S”– swarm together at mating time, but they rarely mate with a mosquito of the other type. Medical entomologist Gabriella Gibson of the University of Sussex and the Natural Resources Institute of the University of Greenwich, both in the United Kingdom, wondered how they can tell each other apart.Gibson and colleagues collected larvae of the two forms in Burkina Faso and raised them in the lab. Then they stuck a short piece of wire to their backs with beeswax and brought them within a few centimeters of another bound mosquito of the opposite sex (see picture). The pair flapped in place while a microphone recorded their “music”; mosquitoes sing by speeding up or slowing down their wing beats, which changes the frequency of their high-pitched whines. “It’s very sweet,” says Gibson. “When they’re doing this singing thing, they’re reaching their legs across to the other one, trying to do footsies.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The mosquitoes harmonized–but only with mosquitoes of the same form. A pair of two M or two S mosquitoes aligned their wing beats so that the female beat her wings twice for every three beats of the male’s wings. Like a bowed violin string, the beating wings also created higher frequencies, which match when males and females are harmonizing. “If they’re of the same form, they’ll stick with each other with this harmonizing just for seconds on end,” says Gibson. “If they’re the two opposite types, they really won’t come together.”The mosquitoes aren’t listening to the high harmonics; they can’t hear in that range. Instead, Gibson and colleagues say that the insects use a donut-shaped organ near the bottom of the antenna, the Johnston’s organ, to sense when clashing tones are making the antenna vibrate oddly. When two different forms of A. gambiae try to harmonize, says Gibson, it’s as “if people are trying to talk on the phone in different languages.”The work is the first to explain how the M and S forms in the A. gambiae complex remain genetically distinct–and even how these forms may one day become separate species, says mosquito evolutionary biologist Nora Besansky of the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. But medical entomologist Michel Slotman of Texas A&M University in College Station cautions that the results may not apply in other parts of Africa. In Mali, for example, M and S mosquitoes don’t seem to swarm together, yet they will mate if they’re introduced. So something else is keeping the forms separate in this region.last_img read more

U.S. Senate Confirms Ernest Moniz as Secretary of Energy

first_imgErnest Moniz In a vote of 97-0, the U.S. Senate today confirmed Ernest Moniz as secretary of energy. A theoretical nuclear physicist from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Moniz succeeds Steven Chu, the only other physicist to hold the post since the Department of Energy (DOE) was established in 1977. Moniz, 69, had previously served as undersecretary of energy from 1997 to 2001 and as associate director for science in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1995 to 1997. President Barack Obama nominated Moniz on 4 March. But despite receiving bipartisan support, Moniz had to wait 2 months for Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) to lift a “hold” on his candidacy. Graham was upset because the Obama administration’s 2014 budget request called for a study of alternatives to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, under construction at DOE’s Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The plant is supposed to convert plutonium from weapons into fuel for nuclear power plants, but the study triggered fears that DOE wanted to pull the plug on the project, whose cost has ballooned from $4.9 billion to $7.7 billion. This week, Graham agreed to let the vote on Moniz go forward, although he warned that he might still hold up votes on lower level DOE appointments, according to a report in Environment & Energy Daily. Graham joined in on the unanimous approval for Moniz. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) “My Senate colleagues recognize that Dr. Moniz is smart, he is savvy about how the Department of Energy operates because he has been there before, and he has a proven track record of collaboration, which is just what you need when you’re leading the Department of Energy,” said Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR), chair of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, shortly after the vote. Back at MIT, Robert Armstrong, a chemical engineer, will replace Moniz as director of the MIT Energy Initiative. Armstrong had been Moniz’s deputy. That announcement came just minutes after the Senate vote. Massachusetts Institute of Technology last_img read more

Corporate Strategy Behind NRI CEO’s Being Paid Well

first_imgGiving appointment of NRIs as CEOs in American Companies like Pepsi & Microsoft is strong marketing strategies adopted by them to exploit India’s large emerging markets to sell their products and also to attract Indian students to US Universities facing shortage of students. Related Itemslast_img

Calling it ‘a waste of time,’ researchers call for end to scientific whaling reviews

first_imgThirty-two scientists are calling for an end to the International Whaling Commission’s (IWC’s) current program for reviewing “scientific whaling” proposals.In a letter to the editor in today’s Nature, the researchers, who are members of IWC’s Scientific Committee, argue that IWC’s current review process “is a waste of time” and sorely in need of revision.A prominent case in point, the authors say, is IWC’s experience with Japan’s controversial research whaling programs: Although IWC rules have required a lengthy scientific review of that effort, which began in 1987, the process has also allowed Japanese researchers to essentially ignore the critique.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“Japan … has failed to alter its plans in any meaningful way and is proceeding to kill whales under a self-determined quota,” the authors write.“It’s what happens year after year,” says Andrew Brierley, a pelagic ecologist at University of St. Andrews in the United Kingdom, and one of the letter’s authors. The scientists are “frustrated because the recommendations of the expert panel IWC convened are ignored,” he says.But Joji Morishita, director general of Japan’s National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries, says that Japan’s cetacean scientists “think the review process is quite reasonable, and has helped shape our research and implementation.” And IWC said “the review process has strong scientific merit,” in a statement to ScienceInsider.Meaningful reviews?Although IWC enacted a moratorium on commercial whaling in 1982, one provision in its conventions allows member nations to kill whales for research. IWC doesn’t issue permits for such hunts—the individual countries do. Although Norway and Iceland (which did not agree to the moratorium) also kill whales, Japan is the lone nation to claim it is whaling for scientific purposes. (The meat collected from the hunts is sold in Japan.)Because Japan says it is doing science, it submits its research proposals to IWC’s Scientific Committee to be peer reviewed. The proposals are first examined by an independent panel of experts. Last year, a panel reviewing Japan’s most recent proposal concluded that “lethal sampling had not been justified,” write the authors of the Nature letter.Japanese researchers say they are studying such things as the cetaceans’ health, ages, and diets, and which whales belong to which populations. It’s the kind of information that biologists collect when managing animals for sustainable hunts.The panel, however, recommended that Japan explore other nonlethal methods—already widely used by other cetacean scientists—for collecting that information. Scientists could use darts to collect tissue samples, for instance, or collect feces to determine what the whales are eating.Japan has looked at such methods, says Morishita, noting that IWC’s full scientific committee ultimately “gave us a total of 29 recommendations. … We responded to all of them, as we are required.”Brierley, however, says the back-and-forth produced little change. He joined the expert panel “in good faith,” he says, and then discovered that “it wasn’t a genuine peer review. It doesn’t follow the standard scientific review process.”The procedure is flawed, the authors argue, because at the second stage, when IWC’s science committee meets, it gives equal weight to the opinions of the proposers and the expert panel of referees, and the reviews are nonbinding. If Japan were actually following IWC’s recommendations, Brierley says, it would now be trying to answer its research questions with nonlethal methods.In its statement, IWC points out its reviews and reports “have been widely debated and referenced by parties on all sides of the [scientific whaling] debate including the 2014 ruling of the International Court of Justice,” which found that Japan’s whaling program was not about science.Japan suspended part of its whaling program after that ruling, but has since resumed hunting. Japanese whalers are now in the Southern Ocean, targeting 333 minke whales for the research program; it calls for killing 333 minke whales annually for the next 12 years. Since 1987, Japan has killed 10,712 minke whales for science.last_img read more